Monday, 3 January 2011

Tuesday, 23 February 2010

Apparently, having recently changed jobs there is an expectation that I should announce the move in a blog post. The post should be "wanky", titled with some cliché like "On The Move…" or "New Beginnings" and describe how much I’ll miss my former colleagues but how excited I am to be starting something new.

Well, I usually hate doing what I’m told but I will miss all my former colleagues and I am very excited to be doing something new. So there.

I will be blogging here even less frequently than I already do, in favour of my new work blog, found here. Please add it to your RSS reader or bookmarks. If you want to keep updated on the comings and goings of my career, why aren’t we connected on LinkedIn already?

See you later,

Dan

Saturday, 20 February 2010

Things To Do

Feb 23 - OpenSoho w/ Mark O'Neill, Chief Information Officer for the Department for Culture, Media and Sport
Feb 24 - Cozy Tweetup
Feb 24 - Digital Lounge w/ Mark Curtis, Flirtomatic
March 2 - Ignite London
March 3 - Tech PR Drinks w/ all these people
March 6 - TEDx Warwick w/ Noam Chomsky, Dr Rachel Armstrong, Steve Martin, Alex Wright and others
March 8 - Social Media Monday
March 10 - Social Media Summit 10 w/ Paul Evans, political blogger and journalist, Tom Watson MP and Iain Dale, one of Britain's leading political commentators

Anything else I should add?

Friday, 12 February 2010

Free pizza from Foursquare too good to be true?

It is pizza for dinner tonight. I usually order a tasty vegan pizza from Hell’s Pizza but seeing the recent news from Marketing about Domino’s promotion with Foursquare I thought I’d check them out.

Foursquare is a location sharing social network and game, awarding points and achievements for people who “check-in” from locations with their mobile phones. The top achievement at an establishment on Foursqaure is to be Mayor, the person who has checked in the most.

Debenhams is trialing a promotion in one location, rewarding the most frequent Foursquare visitor with a daily free cup of coffee. Like in Marketing, it was also reported in Electric Pig and other blogs, that Foursquare has “inked a deal” with Domino’s Pizza, offering a free pizza to the Foursquare Mayor every week.

The news spread on Twitter and I was eager to find out more and join in. But, after a Google search, I couldn’t find out any real details.

Unable to find any information, I turned to a source I knew would be reliable: PR people.

Within 15 minutes, I got a reply.

There is a lot of misreporting about this link up at the moment. One of our franchisees in Liverpool has linked up with FourSquare – but we aren’t doing anything at the moment on a national level.

We are in initial discussions with FourSquare and will update you if there’s any progress.

Disappointing news, but it is also a good sign of what innovative social media marketing might be coming soon.

Happy Valentine's Day

"Journalists need love too," but PRs might also enjoy these Valentine's cards from 1000Words.net.

Thanks Sabrina.

Thursday, 11 February 2010

Turn Off Buzz

Google has made its push against Facebook and Twitter with Buzz, and if you have Gmail, without your consent, you are already a participant.


By now, Buzz has already risked your privacy by exposing your most frequently emailed friends. It is automatically following contacts, and having them visible to other Buzz users (read this for more info).


I’m quite happy with my arsenal of social networks and RSS readers and I don’t know if I like the idea of depending on Google for so much. Buzz is apparently set to replace Twitter and Facebook for sharing content with friends, and Buzz buttons are already showing up in blogs:

But, to me, this invasive social network offers nothing I don’t already have, and I suggest that there is just one button you should click:


Tuesday, 9 February 2010

Spokesperson FAIL

LCEC, an American electricity provider, created quite a stir recently as their PR manager's discussion with Florida FOX 4 reporters led to many facepalm moments.

Watch the video here.

A little goodwill towards a customer in need could have saved LCEC a whole lot of trouble, but their PR manager just seems determined to keep digging herself into an even deeper hole.

The whole video is full of #PRFAILs, like telling reporters that the more they bother the PR team the higher the rates will go for customers, trying to entice the FOX 4 manger with promises of a "mutually beneficial relationship" (does that mean advertising?) and calling the media's credibility into question by demanding off-the-record meetings.

For dealing with bad coverage, this is a great example of what not to do.

............................................________
....................................,.-‘”...................``~.,
.............................,.-”...................................“-.,
.........................,/...............................................”:,
.....................,?......................................................\,
.................../...........................................................,}
................./......................................................,:`^`..}
.............../...................................................,:”........./
..............?.....__.........................................:`.........../
............./__.(.....“~-,_..............................,:`........../
.........../(_....”~,_........“~,_....................,:`........_/
..........{.._$;_......”=,_.......“-,_.......,.-~-,},.~”;/....}
...........((.....*~_.......”=-._......“;,,./`..../”............../
...,,,___.\`~,......“~.,....................`.....}............../
............(....`=-,,.......`........................(......;_,,-”
............/.`~,......`-...............................\....../\
.............\`~.*-,.....................................|,./.....\,__
,,_..........}.>-._\...................................|..............`=~-,
.....`=~-,_\_......`\,.................................\
...................`=~-,,.\,...............................\
................................`:,,...........................`\..............__
.....................................`=-,...................,%`>--==``
........................................_\..........._,-%.......`\
...................................,

Saturday, 6 February 2010

Should you cite tweets as a source?

Last week, five journalists in France locked themselves in a farmhouse for five days to test the limits of reporting using sources sent to them on Twitter and Facebook exclusively. Their goal was to test the legitimacy of social media as a news source, and to see if it can stand up on its own.

The debate whether Twitter is a legitimate source for journalists continues, but many journalists are using Twitter to gather information and pitches from PR people with great success. Some have even made accounts especially for it, to separate it from their personal tweets.

Another way a journalist can use Twitter as a source is to crowdsource ideas, making traditional research a lot easier and faster.

One journalist who really embraces crowdsourcing and Twitter is Charles Arthur from the Guardian. He frequently sends out tweets like this:

Before writing articles like this:

Top five Twitter gaffes
The past year has seen been a string of slip-ups on micro-blogging service Twitter, from cricketers to Vodafone staff


Charles has 10,339 followers listening in, and he draws from their knowledge, experience and opinions for his articles. But what do his contributors gain?

As a PR, we know our role in the news process and any form of acknowledgment would never be expected. We’re paid to provide journalists with information in the interest of our clients. But, out in blog land, credit is expected where credit is due.

In the blogosphere, a hat tip, or even a small mention, is common courtesy, and anything less might be considered rude. Even in mainstream news, a newspaper wouldn’t use information from another paper or a blog without acknowledging credit. So, where do tweets fit in?

If Twitter is increasingly becoming recognised as a legitimate news source, should citing individual tweets be standard?
Or, are tweets akin to overhearing someone in the street, and not a citable news source?

As mainstream media moves more and more online and increasingly acts like a blog, should they adopt the standard blogging practices?

I’d really appreciate hearing your opinion on it.

Wednesday, 20 January 2010

I Fancy A Snog

I spotted this cool marketing campaign using Twitter and Facebook posted outside a construction site today. Responses tweeted to @ifancyasnog get placed on to the wall. The combination of eye-catching display on the street, social media involvement and first-kiss nostalgia is a creative way to sell frozen yogurt.

Tuesday, 19 January 2010